5 Surefire Ways to Make a Memorable Impression at a Job Interview


So, you've managed to get an interview with your employer of interest, and now you're trying to figure out how to make a memorable impression so that you'll surely land the job. Interviews are difficult to get, and you generally only have one chance to make your impression. Instead of winging it and merely hoping that the interviewer will care about who you are, use these tips to significantly increase your chances of impressing the interviewer.

Show the Interviewer You're Truly Interested in the Job

Even if you're sweating bullets about the job in question or the intimidating process of being interviewed, try to exude confidence. Show the interviewer(s) that you care about getting the position and about the company, not just about impressing them. This means you should sit up straight, hold your head high, and make eye contact when answering questions or speaking. Provide thought out answers, and avoid long pauses, shrugs, or repeatedly saying, "um" or "uh." Be thoughtful about your answers—you'll sound more genuine. The interviewer will expect you to be nervous, so focus on giving honest, thoughtful answers to their questions more than you focus on what they think of you.

Act Like a Pro

No matter what type of job you are interviewing for, try to display the highest level of professionalism possible. Your employer will be impressed if they feel as if they are talking with a colleague instead of someone who just walked off the street looking for a job. Make sure you have a professional resume and any other documents that are relevant to the interview that will display your skills. Showing up to the interview empty handed will make it look like you haven't given much thought to the job. From the moment you walk in, you need to act like a professional, and you must be prepared to prove your professionalism.

Be Yourself

It's easy for employers to tell when their interviewee has spent the previous night scouring the internet for default interview questions and responses, only to recycle them once the interview rolls around. When you answer questions, just be yourself, speak your mind, and show the interviewer who you really are. While you should be professional, you don't want to seem void of a personality. Be lively, friendly, and enthusiastic while also maintaining a level of professionalism.

Give the Interviewer Exactly What They're Looking For

If the interviewer asks you about your skill set, go ahead and toot your own horn a bit, but don't make the mistake of veering off to a topic that won't provide you any real help with landing the job. You need to find the perfect balance of exuding confidence but not offending the interviewer by being cocky.  The interviewer only wants to know that you're a good fit for the position in question, so be sure to stay on topics that back you up as a promising candidate. One of the best ways to avoid appearing cocky is to confidently talk about your accomplishments or skills, but mention that you are eager to learn and improve.

Chit Chat with the Interviewer Only if They Initiate It

Sometimes, the topic of conversation will flow from topic to topic in interviews, and this can sometimes be helpful. Don't allow this to happen unless the interviewer initiates it. However, even if it does happen, keep casually reminding the interviewer of your skills and how much they would mean to the company in question. As mentioned before, you want to be professional, but show you have a personality. Follow the lead of the interviewer and allow them to set the tone for the conversation. Many interviewers will be put off by someone who tries to dominate the conversation.

Overall, to make a memorable impression, you should find a way to connect with the interviewer. You want to be professional, but don't be a bore. On the other hand, don't overwhelm them by being too outspoken—that will make them remember you, but not in a good way. If you can find the perfect balance of professionalism and personable qualities, you will be able to connect with the interviewer and show them that you are are qualified for the job and also a pleasant person to work with.

Author Bio: This article was written by Dixie Somers, a freelance writer who loves to write for business, finance, women's interests or technology. Dixie lives in Arizona with her husband and three beautiful daughters.  Graphic professionals who specialize in Commercial Printing in Pittsburgh suggest that you use nice graphics to create an impressive resume, and even consider printing your own business cards to give you a little something extra when you go in for an interview.

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